Articles

paleoart authorMark P. Witton. School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth, PO1 3QL UK
markwitton.com; markwitton-com.blogspot.com, Twitter. @markwitton
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Mark Witton is a palaeontological artist, author and researcher based at the University of Portsmouth, UK. His research focuses mostly on pterosaurs, the flying reptiles contemporaneous with non-avian dinosaurs, with particular interest in their lifestyles, palaeoecology and functional morphology. He is the author and artist of the acclaimed Pterosaurs: Natural History, Evolution, Anatomy (2013, Princeton University Press) as well as the palaeoart collection Recreating an Age of Reptiles (2017, Crowood Press). Mark's palaeoartworks have featured in numerous research papers, news reports, books, television shows, museums and art galleries, including London's Southbank and the American Museum of Natural History. His upcoming books, The Palaeoart Handbook (2018, Crowood Press) and Life Through The Ages II (2018, Indiana University Press) focus on the history and scientific theory of palaeoart.

 

authorEsperanzaCerdeño. IANIGLA, CCT-CONICET-Mendoza, Avenida Ruiz Leal s/n, 5500 Mendoza, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Originally from Spain, Dr. Cerdeño studied Biological Sciences at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, where she obtained her PhD (in Spanish: Doctora en Ciencias Biológicas) and specialized on fossil rhinoceroses. After moving to Argentina, she has focused on native South American ungulates, mainly the different families of Notoungulata. In 2005, she became a researcher of CONICET (Consejo nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas) working at IANIGLA (Instituto de Glaciología, Nivología y Ciencias Ambientales) in Mendoza city, central-western Argentina.

 

turtle authorDarren Naish. Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Darren is a researcher, author, editor and consultant based in Southampton, UK. He received his PhD at the University of Portsmouth following his work on Early Cretaceous theropod dinosaurs, in particular the tyrannosauroid Eotyrannus. His main areas of research interest include azhdarchoid pterosaurs, parvipelvian ichthyosaurs and the dinosaurs of the Lower Cretaceous Wealden Supergroup.

 

reviewerAdam Pritchard
NSF Postdoctoral Fellow
Department of Geology & Geophysics
Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA
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Adam Pritchard received a Ph.D. in vertebrate anatomy from the Department of Anatomical Sciences at Stony Brook University. His research focused on the initial radiation of crown Diapsida in the Permian and Triassic periods and the Mesozoic diversification of Crocodylomorpha. He is currently researching the evolution of the diapsid postcranial skeleton at Yale University.

 

bones authorShaena Montanari
Newton International Fellow
School of GeoSciences
University of Edinburgh, UK
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Shaena received her Ph.D. from the Richard Gilder Graduate School at the American Museum of Natural History. She is currently a Newton International Fellow of the Royal Society at the University of Edinburgh. Her research traces dietary and environmental changes in extinct and extant vertebrate communities using both morphological evidence and stable isotope analysis.

 

authorNeil Brocklehurst. Museum für Naturkunde, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions- und Biodiversitätsforschung, Invalidenstraße 43, 10115 Berlin, Germany, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Neil Brocklehurst is a postdoctoral researcher at the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin. He is a Vertebrate Palaeontologist, primarily interested in the earliest evolution of terrestrial vertebrates during the late Palaeozoic. He completed his MSci degree in Palaeobiology at University College London, and undertook a PhD at the Museum für Naturkunde and the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. During this time he has carried out research into the completeness of the fossil record and the methods used to examine changes in species richness, origination and extinction rates, and diversification.

 

Arbour, Victoria M. Paleontology Research Lab, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, and Department of Biological Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Victoria received her PhD from the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and is currently a postdoctoral scholar at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences and North Carolina State University in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. She studies the systematics, evolution, and palaeobiology of the armoured dinosaurs known as ankylosaurs, and is interested in the evolution of weaponry in vertebrates.

 

ted fremdTheodore J. Fremd
Dept. of Geological Sciences and
Museum of Natural and Cultural History
The University of Oregon
1680 E. 15th Ave.
Eugene, Oregon 97403-1224
U.S.
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Ted Fremd recently retired from the U. S. National Park Service. During his time as a paleontologist and senior science advisor, he pioneered collaborative approaches to the management of paleontological resources on public lands. He now divides his time between "guest scientist" activities at John Day Fossil Beds National Monument and as an adjunct curator and research associate at the University of Oregon. His research focus remains principally on the biostratigraphy of the John Day Basin of eastern Oregon.