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may photoSteven R. May
University of Texas
Jackson School of Geosciences
Vertebrate Paleontology Laboratory
R7600
Austin, Texas 78758
USA

Steve May is currently a Research Associate at the University of Texas, Jackson School of Geosciences, Vertebrate Paleontology Lab. His research interests include Neogene mammals, paleogeography and geochronology.

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sarnaAndrei M. Sarna-Wojcicki
United States Geological Survey
345 Middlefield Road MS-973
Menlo Park, California 94025
USA

Andrei Sarna-Wojcicki is Geologist Emeritus with the U.S. Geological Survey. His research interests include tephrochronology, active fault studies, volcanism, and tectonics.

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linsday photoEverett H. Lindsay
University of Arizona
Department of Geosciences
Gould-Simpson Building #77
1040 E 4th St.
Tucson, Arizona 85721
USA

Everett Lindsay taught vertebrate paleontology and studied small mammals, especially rodents, as well as correlation of mammal faunas with the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale at the University of Arizona in Tucson for 29 years prior to his retirement in 1996.

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woodburne photoMichael O. Woodburne
Museum of Northern Arizona
3101 N. Ft. Valley Rd.
Flagstaff, Arizona 86001
USA

Michael Woodburne is Emeritus Professor of Geology at UC Riverside. Now retired to Flagstaff, AZ, Mike has worked on fossil mammals, and their stratigraphy and geochronology from Australia, the Mojave Desert of California, hipparions from both the New and Old Worlds, and found the first fossil mammals from Antarctica.

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opdyke2Neil D. Opdyke
University of Florida
Dept. of Geological Sciences
Gainesville, Florida 32611
USA

Neil Opdyke is Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of Florida. His research interests include paleomagnetism and its application to tectonics and magnetostratigraphy, as well as paleoclimatology and paleogeography of the Phanerozoic.

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elmiraElmira Wan
United States Geological Survey
345 Middlefield Road
Menlo Park, California 94025
USA

Elmira Wan is a Geologist at the U.S. Geological Survey, and Chief of the USGS Tephrochronology Project in Menlo Park, CA. Her research interests include Neogene and Quaternary tephrochronology, and stratigraphy, and Cenozoic planktic foraminiferal biostratigraphy, and paleoceanography.

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wahl photoDavid B. Wahl
United States Geological Survey
345 Middlefield Road
Menlo Park, California 94025
USA

David Wahl is a Research Geographer with the U.S. Geological Survey. His research interests include paleoclimatology, paleoecology, reconstruction of paleoenvironments, palynology, geochemistry and tephrochronology.

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olson photo 2Holly Olson
United States Geological Survey
345 Middlefield Road
Menlo Park, California 94025
USA

Holly Olson received her Bachelor’s degree in geology from San Francisco State University. She then went on to work at the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, CA for the Tephrochronolgy Project both in the laboratory and the electron microprobe. Her work primarily focused on chemical composition and correlation of tephra from across the Western U.S. for a wide variety of collaborative studies.

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