author1Brian F. Kuhn
Evolutionary Studies Institute
University of the Witwatersrand
Johannesburg South Africa
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr. Brian Kuhn is a Senior Researcher with the Evolutionary Studies Institute, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. His specialties are comparative anatomy, carnivore ecology and fossil carnivores. He is the current permit holder and principle investigator for the Taung World Heritage site.

divider

author2Kristian J. Carlson
Evolutionary Studies Institute
University of the Witwatersrand
Johannesburg South Africa
and Department of Anthropology
Indiana University
Bloomington, Indiana, USA
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr. Kristian Carlson is presently a Senior Researcher with the Evolutionary Studies Institute, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. He is a functional morphologist specializing in the use of computer-assisted methods to better understand both extinct and extant species.

divider

author3Philip J. Hopley
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Birkbeck
University of London
London, England
and Department of Earth Sciences
University College London
London, England
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr. Phil Hopley is a Lecturer in Palaeoclimatology at Birkbeck, University of London. He is interested in the environmental and climatic context of hominin evolution in Africa. He uses the stable isotope geochemistry of carbonate rocks and fossil tooth enamel to reconstruct Plio-Pleistocene climate change and to investigate the habitat preferences of early hominins.

divider

author4Bernhard Zipfel
Evolutionary Studies Institute
University of the Witwatersrand
Johannesburg South Africa
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr. Bernhard Zipfel is the University Curator of Fossils and Rock Collections at the University of the Witwatersrand. He has a special interest in the biomechanics and evolution of the human foot, the origins of hominin bipedalism, palaeopathology and the preservation of natural history collections. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of the Witwatersrand.

divider

author5Lee R. Berger
Evolutionary Studies Institute
University of the Witwatersrand
Johannesburg South Africa
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Professor Lee R. Berger is the Research Professor in Human Evolution and the Public Understanding of Science at the University of the Witwatersrand's Evolutionary Studies Institute. He is also an Explorer in Residence for the National Geographic Society.

divider