FIGURE 1. Locality map within the Lower Hudson Valley of New York and northern New Jersey Piedmont with proposed path of glacial transport from the Rickard Hill facies (RHf) of the Saugerties Member of the Schoharie Formation, Helderberg Mountains region, New York. (*1) RHf exposure belt; (*2-*8) fossiliferous glacial erratics described in Becker and Bartholomew (2013); Becker et al. (2016; 2017) and this report. Inset maps: (a) physiographic provinces of New Jersey and (b) High Mountain, Wayne, New Jersey, region. Note: limit of Wisconsin Glaciation, Skunnemunk Mountains, Ramapo Mountains. Redrawn from Becker et al. (2017).

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FIGURE 2. Outcrop exposure of the RHf with Gumaer Island, Aquetuck and Saugerties Members of the Schoharie Formation along Route 85, Clarksville, New York. Note that RHf is dipping to the northwest and drag folded as the result of thrust faulting. Also see Ver Straeten (1995; 2007). (1) Modified from Figure 19 of Ver Straeten (2007); (2) Third order eustatic sea level cycles Emsian 5 and Eifelian 1 in relationship to the RHf post-mortem lag deposit as indicated by asterisks (See Ver Straeten, 2007 and Becker et al., 2017); (3) Example of orthoconic nautiloids (f1) exposed along bedrock surface as indicated by arrows. (4) Close-up of drag folding seen in RHf outcrop along Route 85, Clarksville, New York. Note concentration of invertebrate casts and molds indicated by arrow; and, (5) Unweathered surface of RHf exposing dense, bluish-gray limestone adjacent to yellowish-brown to tan weathered surface of RHf demonstrating characteristic concentrations of invertebrate casts and molds as indicated by arrows. Abbreviations: RHf-Rickard Hill facies; GU-Gumaer Island Member; A-S-Aquetuck and Saugerties Members.

 

FIGURE 3. Outcrop exposure of the RHf of the Saugerties Member of the Schoharie Formation, Feura Bush, New York. Note distinct erosional surfaces seen in (1) as indicated by lines and arrows; concentration of invertebrate casts and molds of seen in cross-section as indicated by arrows (2); and, (3) molds of orthoconic (f1) nautiloids in RHf talus adjacent to outcrop indicated by arrows. Abbreviations: RHf-Rickard Hill facies; Edg-Edgecliff Member.

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FIGURE 4. Glacial erratics of the RHf as seen in the Lower Hudson Valley of New York and northern New Jersey Piedmont. Note both rounded (1-2) and blocky (3) types of glacial erratics, numerous casts and molds similar to outcrop exposures as seen along exterior surfaces, and burial in regional soils. Orthoconic (f1) and coiled (f2) nautiloids described in this report and seen in Figures 6.2, 10.1, and 13.3 were recovered along the interior bedding surfaces in these RHf glacial erratics.

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FIGURE 5. Thin section petrographic comparison of RHf outcrop (1) to that seen in glacial erratics (2) and large glacial erratic (3) split along bedding plane demonstrating concentric chemical weathering rind and (f1) nautiloids. Note the overall loss of original calcite via dissolution between outcrop and glacial erratic thin sections and the chemically resistant nature of the sub-angular to sub-rounded quartz grains. Abbreviations: f1-form 1; cw-chemical weathering rind.

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FIGURE 6. Orthoconic nautiloid casts belonging to (f1) from RHf glacial erratics demonstrating similar orientations on bedding surfaces as indicated by arrows. Note differences in chemical weathering as seen in color variations along bedding surfaces. The largest (f1) nautiloids recovered during this study occur on (2) which also contains thin films of redeposited calcitic shell material that were dissolved and fluidized during chemical weathering and dissolution. Original shell material of brachiopods indicated by white arrow in (2). Abbreviations: f1-form 1; cw-chemical weathering rind.

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FIGURE 7. Orthoconic nautiloid casts belonging to (f1) from RHf glacial erratics demonstrating brachiopods and rugose corals within body chambers and phragmocones (1, 3, 4) and chemical erosion exposure of suture pattern and septa (2, 5). Abbreviations: f1-form 1; bp-brachiopod; sd-sediment infill; cr-rugose coral; su-suture; se-septa; bo-shell bioerosion. Note numerous brachiopods and corals along bedding planes in (2) and (4).

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FIGURE 8. Orthoconic nautiloid casts belonging to (f1) from RHf glacial erratics demonstrating body chambers filled with sediment, cephala from the trilobite and brachiopods (1, 2; 3-inset). Abbreviations: f1-form 1; bp-brachiopod; sd-sediment infill; tc-trilobite cephalon.

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FIGURE 9. Orthoconic nautiloid casts belonging to (f1) from RHf glacial erratics demonstrating crushed and faulted conchs (1-3), bored body chamber with bored brachiopod inside the body chamber (4), and organic encrustation of a brachiopod valve (5). Note differences in chemical erosion in (1) as well as original shell material. Abbreviations: f1-form 1; ft-fault; cw-chemical weathering rind; cu-crushed body chamber; bp-brachiopod; bo-shell bioerosion; oe-organic encrustation.

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FIGURE 10. Orthoconic and coiled nautiloid casts belonging to (f1) and (f2) from RHf glacial erratics. (1-2) Simple suture pattern that is distinctly rounded and appears bead-like due to cameral deposits and a pygidium with telson of the trilobite crushed against body chamber as indicated by arrow along with several casts of brachiopods; (3) Well-preserved example of (f2) cast demonstrating simple suture pattern, megastriae and slight coiling out of the bedding plane in phragmocone portion as indicated by arrow. Abbreviations: f1-form 1; cd-cameral deposits; tp-trilobite pygidium; f2-form 2; me-megastria.

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FIGURE 11. Coiled nautiloid casts and mold belonging to (f2) from RHf glacial erratics with a distinct chevron pattern in the ventral sinus and megastriae positioned where the shell wall and septum meet. Note brachiopod casts preserved within and adjacent to body chambers (1, 3, 4-casts and 2-mold). Abbreviations: (f2)-form 2; me-megastria; vs-ventral sinus; bp-brachiopod.

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FIGURE 12. Coiled nautiloid casts and molds belonging to (f2) from RHf glacial erratics. Note brachiopods preserved near the opening of the body chamber in (1-2); branching coral and trilobite pygidium in (3) and genial spine of trilobite in (4) indicated by arrows; (1, 3, 4-casts and 2-mold). The largest (f2) nautiloid recovered during this study occurs on (1-2). Abbreviations: f2-form 2; bp-brachiopod; nd-node; cw-chemical weathering rind; f1-form 1.

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FIGURE 13. Co-occurrence of (f1) and (f2) nautiloids along with trilobite cephala and brachiopods within body chambers (1-3); and (4) distinct differences in stages of chemical weathering of an (f2) nautiloid as seen in RHf glacial erratics. Note numerous trilobites, brachiopods and corals along bedding planes in (1-3). Abbreviations: f1-form 1; f2-form 2; bp-brachiopod; tc-trilobite cephalon; cw-chemical weathering rind.

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