Home

Article Search

author guoJunfeng Guo. School of Earth Science and Resources, Key Laboratory of Western China’s Mineral Resources and Geological Engineering, Ministry of Education, Chang’an University, Xi’an 710054, China; Early Life Institute, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Early Life and Environments, State Key Laboratory of Continental Dynamics and Department of Geology, Northwest University, Xi’an, 710069, China; State Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and Stratigraphy (Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, CAS), Nanjing 210008, China.

 Junfeng Guo is an associate professor at the Department of Geology, Chang’an University.He received his Bachelor’s and Master’s from Chang’an University, and Ph.D. from the Department of Geology in Northwest University, China. He worked as a visiting scholar at Department of Geosciences, Virginia Tech, USA. His main research interests include Small Selly fossils and Macrofossils from the Early Cambrian Yanjiahe Biota.

 

divider

author chenYanlong Chen. Early Life Institute, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Early Life and Environments, State Key Laboratory of Continental Dynamics and Department of Geology, Northwest University, Xi’an, 710069, China. (*Author for correspondence)

Yanlong Chen is an associate professor at the Department of Geology, Northwest University. He received his Bachelor’s and Master’s from China University of Geosciences (Wuhan), and Ph.D. in 2015 from the Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Graz, Austria. His research focused on both Cambrian small shelly fossils and Triassic conodonts. 

 

divider

author songZuchen Song. School of Earth Science and Resources, Key Laboratory of Western China’s Mineral Resources and Geological Engineering, Ministry of Education, Chang’an University, Xi’an 710054, China.

 Zucheng Song is a Ph.D student at the Department of Geology, Chang’an University. He received his Bachelor’s and Master’s from Chang’an University, His main research interests in Macrofossils from the Early Cambrian Yanjiahe Biota.

 

divider

author zhangZhifei Zhang. Early Life Institute, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Early Life and Environments, State Key Laboratory of Continental Dynamics and Department of Geology, Northwest University, Xi’an, 710069, China.

 Zhifei Zhang is a Professor of Paleontology in the Department of Geology in Northwest University, Xi'an, China. He received his Bachelor’s from Life Science College and Master's and Ph.D. from the Department of Geology, both in Northwest University, China before he finished one-year postdoctoral visiting study at faculty of Earth Science in Uppsala University, Sweden. He is interested in the evolution of Cambrian Burgess Shale type soft-bodied faunas. His research is focused on exceptionally preserved brachiopods and other lophotrochozoan fossils.

 

divider

author qiangYaqin Qiang. School of Earth Science and Resources, Key Laboratory of Western China’s Mineral Resources and Geological Engineering, Ministry of Education, Chang’an University, Xi’an 710054, China.

 Yaqin Qiang is a Master student at the Department of Geology, Chang’an University. Her main research interests in Small Selly fossils from the Early Cambrian Yanjiahe Biota.

 

divider

author bettsMarissa J. Betts. Early Life Institute, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Early Life and Environments, State Key Laboratory of Continental Dynamics and Department of Geology, Northwest University, Xi’an, 710069, China and Palaeoscience Research Centre, School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale, New SouthWales 2351, Australia.

 Marissa J. Betts is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of New England, Armidale, Australia. She completed a BSc (Hons) in palaeobiology at Macquarie University in 2012 in which she examined the relationship between early Cambrian shelly fossils and archaeocyath bioherms in the Arrowie Basin, South Australia. She completed a PhD at Macquarie University in 2016 researching the application of early Cambrian shelly taxa as biostratigraphic tools, and their utility for regional and global correlation. Ongoing work includes complementing the biostratigraphic studies with high resolution chemostratigraphic data and investigations into the palaeobiology and functional morphology of early Cambrian taxa.

 

divider

author zhengYajuan Zheng. School of Earth Science and Resources, Key Laboratory of Western China’s Mineral Resources and Geological Engineering, Ministry of Education, Chang’an University, Xi’an 710054, China.

 Yajuan Zheng is a lecturer at the Department of Geology in Chang’an University, China, where she obtained her Ph.D. in Paleontology and Stratigraphy. Her recent work centered on the embryos fossil from the Early Cambrian Kuanchuanpu Formation, Shaanxi Province, China.

 

 

divider

author yaoXiaoyong Yao. School of Earth Science and Resources, Key Laboratory of Western China’s Mineral Resources and Geological Engineering, Ministry of Education, Chang’an University, Xi’an 710054, China.

Xiaoyong Yao is a lecturer at the Department of Geology in Chang’an University, China. He received his Bachelor’s from Life Science College and Master's and Ph.D. from the Department of Geology, both in Northwest University, China. He worked as a visiting scholar at the University of Tokyo, Japan. His recent work centered on the embryos fossil from the Early Cambrian Kuanchuanpu Formation, Shaanxi Province, China.

logo smallPalaeontologia Electronica
Webmaster
1998–2020
23 years of electronic palaeontology

PE is archived by CLOCKSS and LOCKSS programs.