Articles

After publications the authors were made aware that SVP meeting policy specifically prohibits the photography and recording of presentations at our annual meetings without the express permission of the author.

Original text:
Likewise, talks given at a conference can be live-streamed or recorded to be made available to people who cannot or prefer not to travel. An example of this practice is at www.palaeocast.com, which offers live-streaming coverage and recorded talks for large-scale (e.g., SVP) and medium-scale (e.g., Progressive Palaeontology and EAVP) conferences.

Replacement text:
Likewise, talks given at a conference can be live-streamed or recorded to be made available to people who cannot or prefer not to travel. An example of this practice is at www.palaeocast.com, which offers live-streaming coverage and recorded talks of conferences such as PalAss, SVPCA and EAVP.

 

6 February 2018

 

FIGURE 1. An active but measured participation in academic conferences could be evaluated as a positive performance indicator. The ecological and social impact of this activity should be taken into consideration.

figure1

 

sanchezMarcelo R. Sánchez-Villagra. Universität Zürich, Paläontologisches Institut und Museum, Karl-Schmid-Strasse 4, 8006 Zürich, Switzerland. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Marcelo R. Sánchez-Villagra is Associate Professor of Palaeobiology at the University of Zurich, where he founded the 'Evolutionary Morphology and Palaeobiology of Vertebrates' research group . He contributed to the movement leading to the leagal approval of insects as human food source in Switzerland, is a member of the Sustainability committee at his University and hosted the 2013-2014 Cogito Symposium on Evolution in the Human and Social Sciences. His current main research focus is the evo-devo of animal domestication.

divider

aguirre fernandezGabriel Aguirre-Fernández. Universität Zürich, Paläontologisches Institut und Museum, Karl-Schmid-Strasse 4, 8006 Zürich, Switzerland. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Gabriel Aguirre is a vertebrate paleontologist (postdoctoral researcher) at the University of Zurich. He received degrees from the University of Baja California Sur (BSc, marine biology), University of Baja California (MSc, Oceanography), and Otago University (PhD, geology). His research mostly focuses on alpha taxonomy of whales and dolphins. He is also interested in the transition of dolphins to a freshwater habitat and the use of cladistics and morphometrics to explore phylogenetic and functional questions.

divider

chinsamy turanAnusuya Chinsamy-Turan. University of Cape Town, Biological Sciences, Private Bag X3, Rhodes Gift, 7701, South Africa. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Professor Anusuya Chinsamy-Turan is a palaeobiologist based in the Department of Biological Sciences the University of Cape Town. She is a global expert on the microscopic structure of the bones of extinct and extant vertebrates. Her work has been recognized by several highly acclaimed awards: For example, she was recently awarded an NRF A-rating (which recognizes her as a world leader in her field), and the world Academy of Science's 2013 Popularization of Science and Public Understanding Award for Sub Saharan Africa. In 2005 she won the South African Woman of the Year Award, which acknowledges her contribution to science both in terms of research and science communication to the wider public. In 2005 she also won the "Distinguished Women Scientist Award" from the South African Department of Science and Technology. Professor Chinsamy-Turan has published extensively - both in international scientific journals (including 4 publications in Nature, 2 in Nature Communications, and recently one in Nature's Scientific Reports), as well as in the popular press. She is former President of the Association of South African Women in Science and Engineering (SAWISE), former Deputy President of the Academy of Science of South Africa, and she has also served as Director of Iziko Museums Natural History Collections, and as Chair of the Advisory Board of Scifest Africa (the biggest science festival in Africa), and as Chair of the Department of Biological Sciences at UCT. She is currently a board member for the US- based Jurassic Foundation, and Chair of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology's Romer-Simpson Prize Committee. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of South African, the University of Cape Town, and the World Academy of Science. Her academic books, Microstructure of Dinosaur Bone - Deciphering Biology Through Fine Scale Techniques was published by Johns Hopkins University Press, USA in 2005) and the more recent, "Forerunners of Mammals: Radiation. Histology. Biology" by Indiana University Press, USA in 2012. She has also published two popular level books entitled, "Famous Dinosaurs of Africa" (2008, RandomHouseStruik, SA) and "Fossils for Africa" (2014, Cambridge University Press).

divider

badgleyCatherine Badgley. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Catherine Badgley studies paleoecology and biogeography of mammals. She teaches courses about biogeography, macroevolution, environmental science and sustainability. She is a former president of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology.

 

 

FIGURE 1. 1. Eekaulostomus cuevasae, an extinct armored trumpetfish, and the top open access fossil taxon of 2017 (Farke, 2017). Reproduced from Cantalice and Alvarado-Ortega (2016). 2. Illustration of trumpetfish from Brian Engh, http://dontmesswithdinosaurs.com.

1.

open access figure

 

2.

open access

 

bronzotiMario Bronzati. Bayerische Staatssammlung für Paläontologie und Geologie. Richard–Wagner–Str. 10, 80333, Munich, Germany, and Department of Earth and Enviromental Sciences, Ludwig–Maximilians–Universität, Richard–Wagner–Str. 10, 80333, Munich, Germany. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mario Bronzati got his bachelor's (2009) and master's (2012) degrees from the University of São Paulo, Brazil. He moved to Germany in 2013 for a PhD in the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich, conducting his research in the Bavarian State Collection for Palaeontology. The main topic of his PhD research is the evolution of the braincase anatomy in sauropodomorph dinosaurs. He is also interested in the early evolution of dinosaurs and in the evolution of Crocodyliformes.

 

FIGURE 1. Simplified cladogram showing the relationships of the three main lineages of dinosaurs with focus on Sauropodomorpha. Letters A - F are related to clades treated in the main text. The assumed ages for the taxa of the tree are represented by rectangles thicker than other branches. Cladogenetic events (dichotomies) are not calibrated against geological time. Ornithischia is represented by the following taxa: Pisanosaurus, Heterodontosauridae, Eocursor, Thyreophora, Neornithischia. Theropoda is represented by the following taxa: Tawa, coelophysoids, Ceratosauria, Tetanurae. All other taxa represent Sauropodomorpha (here following the definition of Galton and Upchurch, 2004). Sauropoda (here following the definition of Salgado et al., 1997) is represented by Vulcanodon, Tazoudasaurus, Spinophorosaurus, Neosauropoda.

figure1 

FIGURE 2. Simplified version of the cladogram of Figure 1 showing the relationships of the three main lineages of dinosaurs with focus on Sauropodomorpha. ‘Sauropodomorpha A’ and ‘Sauropodomorpha B’ represent two hypothetical taxa that are more closely related to Saturnalia than to Sauropoda. Ornithischia is represented by a single terminal taxon and Theropoda is represented by the living bird Gallus gallus.

figure2 

FIGURE 3. Hypothetical data matrix and the most parsimonious tree obtained when it is analysed using parsimony.

figure3

 

Julien Louys

 

 

Andrew Bush

 

 

James W. Hagadorn

 

 

Norman MacLeod

 

 


R. Timothy Patterson

 

 

P. David Polly

 

 

Jennifer Pattison Rumford

 

 

FIGURE 1. Numbers of published articles in Palaeontologia Electronica, per year (2017 exclusive). This graph was drawn using PAST ver. 2.17c (Hammer et al. 2001).

20 figure1 

FIGURE 2. Research articles published in Palaeontologia Electronica for each year (2017 exclusive), expressed as a percentage of each article category. Over the years PE has published research articles in a number of sub-categories: a Critical Review category was used briefly, Technical Articles have been differentiated from Research Articles since 2009, and the Fossil Calibration Articles were introduced in 2015. However, for consistency and in order to examine our 20 year trends, I have gone back through all research articles and retroactively assigned each to one of five categories: Research, Technical, Taxonomic, Review/Atlas/Guide, and Fossil Calibration.

 20 figure2

FIGURE 3. Research articles published in Palaeontologia Electronica for each year (2017 exclusive), expressed as a percentage of each palaeontological sub-discipline. This represents a somewhat more arbitrary (compared to Figure 2) assignment of each research article to one of 11 palaeontological sub-disciplines. This assignment is more arbitrary because many articles aren’t easily categorised into a single sub-discipline and, depending on subject matter, the sub-disciplines themselves can overlap. Other articles, particularly highly technical articles, don’t always fit so neatly within any strictly palaeontological sub-discipline. Nevertheless, primarily on the basis of article title, with reference to the abstract and keywords where necessary, each article has been assigned as Museum/Education, Micropalaeontology, Palaeobotany, Palynology, Invertebrate Palaeontology, Vertebrate Palaeontology, Taphonomy, Ichnology, Palaeoecology, Epistemology/Philosophy, and Stratigraphy/Geology.

20 figure3 

 

 

macfaddenBruce J. MacFadden. Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 USA, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Bruce J. MacFadden is Distinguished Professor and Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology at the Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida. He is the Principal Investigator/Project Director of the FOSSIL project. His interests include Cenozoic mammals of the New World and STEM learning, in both formal and informal settings.

divider

lundgrenLisa Lundgren. School of Teaching and Learning, College of Education, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 USA, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Lisa Lundgren is a PhD student in Science Education at the University of Florida. Her interests include broadening participation in paleontology, developing museum education programming and understanding the ways in which social media can be used to enhance informal science learning.

divider

crippenKent Crippen. School of Teaching and Learning, College of Education, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 USA, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Kent Crippen is an Associate Professor of STEM education in the School of Teaching and Learning at the University of Florida and Co-Principal Investigator on the FOSSIL project. His research involves the design, development, and evaluation of transformational cyberlearning environments as well as teacher professional development.

divider

dunckelBetty A. Dunckel. Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 USA, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Betty A. Dunckel is Program Director/Associate Scientist for the Center for Science Learning at the Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida. She is a Co-Principal Investigator on the FOSSIL project. She has formed partnerships and developed numerous programs that promote science interest, understanding and engagement for diverse audiences.

divider

ellisShari Ellis. Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 USA, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">

Shari Ellis is a Co-Principal Investigator of the FOSSIL project. She is interested in learning in social contexts, both in school and out.

divider

 

atlas hendricksJonathan Hendricks
Department of Geology
307 Duncan Hall
One Washington Square
San José State University
San José, California 95192 USA
and Paleontological Research Institution
1259 Trumansburg Road
Ithaca, New York 14850
USA
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Jon Hendricks is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geology at San José State University (SJSU) and a Research Associate of the Paleontological Research Institution in Ithaca, New York. Jon received his B.S. in Geology & Geophysics and Zoology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his Ph.D. in Geological Sciences from Cornell University. He was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Kansas before moving to SJSU. His current research focuses on reconstructing the evolutionary history of Neogene tropical American cone snails. He is also interested in the generation of new digital resources for paleontology.

divider

atlas stigallAlycia Stigall
Department of Geological Sciences and OHIO Center for Ecology and Evolutionary Studies
Ohio University
316 Clippinger Laboratories
Athens, Ohio, 45701
USA
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Alycia Stigall is Professor of Paleontology at Ohio University. Her research focuses on exploring the relationship between speciation, biogeographic distribution, and ecological factors using Ordovician rhynchonelliform brachiopods as model taxa. She and her students examine the how species immigration events, including the Richmondian Invasion and Late Devonian Biodiversity Crisis, contribute to changes in biodiversity patterns in the history of life. The Stigall lab uses a variety of methods including ecological niche modeling, phylogenetic analysis, GIS analyses, and field work to investigate these patterns. The Ordovician Atlas project is a natural extension of this work. To date, over a dozen undergraduate and six graduate students have been involved in the creation of the Ordovician Atlas and its related outreach and digitization activities in the Stigall Lab.

divider

atlas liebermanBruce S. Lieberman
Biodiversity Institute
University of Kansas
Dyche Hall, 1345 Jayhawk Blvd.
Lawrence, KS 66045
USA
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Bruce S. Lieberman is an invertebrate paleontologist who researches macroevolutionary pattern and process. He is a Professor in the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and a Senior Curator in the Biodiversity Institute at the University of Kansas. He received his A.B. at Harvard College, where he was advised by Stephen Jay Gould, and his Ph.D. at Columbia University in New York City, where he was advised by Niles Eldredge. He also did post-doctoral fellowships at Yale University and Harvard, where he worked with Elisabeth Vrba and Andy Knoll, respectively. He is especially interested in macroevolutionary theory and biogeography, as well as in applying phylogenetics, Geographic Information Systems, Ecological Niche Modeling and other quantitative techniques to the study of key episodes in the history of life, and to deduce the role that abiotic and biotic factors play in motivating evolution.